LHomme qui rit (Les grands classiques Culture commune) (French Edition)

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Contents

  1. Calaméo - Kaléidoscope - L'actualité des livres
  2. See a Problem?
  3. L'uomo che ride
  4. Kaléidoscope - L'actualité des livres

Poi a un certo punto leggi: Quei due capitoli preliminari che eri indeciso se buttare nella spazzatura, si rivelano i supporti della storia che abbandona il mare per raggiungere la costa. Io sono cieco parlo e non vedo che siete sordi. Chi legge pensa, chi pensa ragiona.

Chi sta bene ignora e si isola. Lasciate ogni speranza voi che entrate. Leggetelo, ne vale la pena. Mi vien da pensare che Sandro Veronesi si sia ispirato ad essa per il suo Caos calmo. As is often the case with Victor Hugo's works, he often tends to discourage the reader towards the beginning of the novel with a long, drawn out description of seemingly mundane details, people, or circumstances.

Then, just as one begins to yawn This is one of the few books I've read where this urge to throw oneself into the story stays throughout the whole novel. The As is often the case with Victor Hugo's works, he often tends to discourage the reader towards the beginning of the novel with a long, drawn out description of seemingly mundane details, people, or circumstances.

The Man Who Laughs also stands as, although one of Hugo's lesser known works, one of his most depressing, and dare I say, even more so than Les Miserables. Not to mention that the whole book is so deliciously and richly written that I could continue assigning food metaphors to it.

View all 4 comments. This is an astonishing book, and quite emotionally draining. I doubt if there is another writer who creates such an understanding of the human condition as does Victor Hugo Seldom have I read a story that was so entirely immersive. The writer took me deeply into the culture of the time, the settings, the politics, and gave me a sense of the day-to-day life. Consequently, I KNEW these characters to the point that I could probably have predicted their actions had the story moved along a different path. Modern readers are likely to be troubled by the at times overwhelming detail.

If your wonderful writing ideal is the work of James Patterson, Hugo's detail will drive you crazy. His characters don't simply walk across town. They interact with their environment to the point that I felt that I was there on many occasions. Yes, there were times that I wished that so much extensive detail had not been provided. Seemingly throw-away acts came back at a crucial point of the story later, and I did not need to stop and ponder, "Oh, who is that character again?

There were times that I literally laughed aloud, was horrified, and cried. That doesn't happen too often for me when reading the written word. Oh, I'm involved to the point of desperately wanting to know what will happen next, but seldom to the point of an injury to a character being an injury to me. This is the third Victor Hugo novel that I've read And while I wouldn't consider this to be his masterwork, I give it a high recommendation without hesitation.

Un'affermazione assolutamente calzante quando ci si trova a dover commentare opere che hanno uno spessore di struttura e contenuti tale da far risultare incompleta e manchevole ogni tentativo di analisi. Non sottilmente sussurrata al fine di dipingere un utile scenario ai fini della narrazione. E' affilata come uno stiletto la penna di Hugo: Bambini che diventano strumenti del poter monarchico freddo calcolatore nel disporre i pezzi sulla scacchiera del Regno. Ursus era un uomo, Homo era un lupo.

Le loro nature erano ben assortite. L'uomo aveva battezzato il lupo.

Eclettico uomo di scienze e arti gira con un carrozzone l'Inghilterra. Non si mise a chiamare. Nonostante la sorpresa, tacque. Nell'imbarcazione c'era lo stesso silenzio. Non un grido del bambino verso gli uomini, non un cenno d'addio degli uomini verso il bambino. Entrambi lasciavano che la distanza tra loro aumentasse, in silenzio. Si separavano come le ombre dei morti sulla riva dello Stige.

Si prosegue per dicotomie: Bocca tirata fino alle orecchie, gengive messe a nudo, naso schiacciato sarai una maschera e riderai sempre: Tu sais, j'aimais pas trop Victor Hugo plus jeune Il faut que aies du temps. Il faut que aies confiance: L'homme qui rit c'est l'Humain avec un grand H, oui. C'est pas grave, toi et moi on a toute la vie pour grimper l'Everest. Si tu veux faire comme moi, je te donne une astuce: Si tu as des questions je suis la d'accord?

I took my time with this one, it's so chock-full of stunning scenes Book Second, chapter 17 - exquisite , symbols, and absolute jewels for sentences - I really cannot say enough about how beautiful the writing is. Hugo has the tendency to rant - he goes on and on about things that seem peripheral - listing the pedigrees and holdings of lords, for one, or including Usus' speeches which are rambling and at times incomprehensible - at least to less than brilliant me - but.

I've avoided reading "Les Miserables" or "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" until now because the stories are so well-known and long, and I've seen the movies , but "The Man Who Laughs" has convinced me that they will be well worth it. I tell you, the part where ten-year-old Gwynplain is abandoned in the snow?

I knew then that Hugo was out to torture me. Some of his work: I highly recommend it. Could not force myself to give this book more than 2 stars cause the goodreads rating systems tells me two stars equals with it's okay rating and three with I liked it, which I didn't. I should also state here that I could not finish it. I gave up on it on page , but I couldn't take it any more. So, why did I picked it up? Hugo is one of my fav authors and he had me bewitched by the notre dame novel.

However, this one was packed with historical facts? I mean, imagin, the sto Could not force myself to give this book more than 2 stars cause the goodreads rating systems tells me two stars equals with it's okay rating and three with I liked it, which I didn't. I mean, imagin, the story actually started on page and it was only one chapter before the historical things started again. The story seemed compelling and the fun fact that Batman's Jocker was inspired by the main character was interesting.

This picture Damn, he looked good in that one. However, like I said, the book was filled with details, character's long long long background stories and many historical events that I am not sure that they've happened. The actual story was spread throught that boring more than page long text and I had actually considared the option of giving up on it for more than five times, but I did hang on cause most of the reviews on Goodreads were 5 star ratings. So, I've thought that maybe it was me and the book is a masterpiece that I can't appreciate. But, honestly, it was too tiring to read.

So, friendly advice to anyone who will pick it up next, if the book doesn't appeal to you from the first ten chapters, give up on it, because it will never get better. Una gran historia de amor y deseos. Apr 26, Ilenia Zodiaco rated it it was amazing Shelves: Hugo si dilunga, si infiamma su dialoghi impossibili, scene da visionario che farebbero mettere le mani nei capelli a qualsiasi amante del realismo a tutti i costi. Il secondo dopo i Miserabili. Invece l'ha quanto meno eguagliato. Non ci sono antagonisti leggendari ma vili, bassi, agenti dell'ombra e che nell'ombra rimarranno senza che il lettore possa darsi pace, sapendo almeno che qualcuno li abbia smascherati, anche se non puniti.

Oscure maree inghiottono i personaggi, naufraghi, vagabondi, mostri deformi, cechi. Ho sempre pensato che Hugo fosse prima poeta e drammaturgo e solo dopo narratore. Altro che romanzo d'appendice. Ma la bellezza di queste idee ambigue - che hanno braccia, gambe, volti, occhi - ci trasporta nell'universo tragico di Hugo. Josiane, personaggio femminile magnifico, moderno e terribile.

Una donna "nata dalla marea", con un occhio azzurro brillante e uno fiammeggiante nero. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. View all 14 comments. Nov 21, Camilla P. Prima di cominciare a scrivere questo commento, devo farvi una premessa. Burbero, schivo, saggio, appassionato: Credo che Hugo si sia specchiato in lui, in un certo senso: Ne sono esempio i dialoghi di due personaggi agli antipodi: Sono le due facce della bellezza edenica: Mi permetto solo un ultimo consiglio, se deciderete di leggere questo libro: Tenetevela per quando avrete finito la lettura: Pass me some tissues, there's too many onions here.

View all 8 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. On a cold January night in , a ten-year-old boy is abandoned near the coast of Portland in England, left for dead by the group whom he has been residing with; Comprachicos, sellers and buyers of intentionally deformed children.

The young child begins to wander the night, battered by a snowstorm and hindered by naked feet, close to death more often than he is aware of. Eventually, his wandering leads him to the body of a woman, frozen to death by the snow, a small infant on her breast crying On a cold January night in , a ten-year-old boy is abandoned near the coast of Portland in England, left for dead by the group whom he has been residing with; Comprachicos, sellers and buyers of intentionally deformed children.

Eventually, his wandering leads him to the body of a woman, frozen to death by the snow, a small infant on her breast crying out into the dark winter, the fragile wail calling the boy to the baby. Not even deliberating, he takes the baby girl in his arms and carries her with him, shedding his own warm jacket to keep the biting chill off her skin; thus he continues, the infant wrapped in his arms and him searching for any sign of civilization. Upon entering a town and finding no one will open their door, he comes upon the tiny caravan of the mountebank Ursus and his pet wolf, Homo, where the children are with grudging tenderness taken in by the old man, given food and clothing and a place to sleep.

It is upon the following morning that Ursus makes two startling discoveries: Fifteen years later, both the boy and girl are still living with Ursus and Homo, having been adopted by the man, and now make a living from performing plays and the effect of Gwynplaine's mask of a face, which earns him the title "The Laughing Man". However, both Gwynplaine and Dea are filled with happiness, due to the fact that they have both fallen deeply and forever in love with the other, Dea being able to see the real beauty of Gwynplaine and him so devoted to the light that is her.

But what is his crime? Does he even have one? This book has so many emotions coursing through it, especially within Gwynplaine, in whom we see adoration and devotion, kindness, innocence, want and lust, the yearning for greater things, extreme pain and sorrow, temptation, and ultimately, the undying love for Dea that brings him back into the world he knows and wouldn't trade for any title. It's a book focusing on the good and bad qualities of man, all shown within Gwynplaine, that prove us human; kindness and cruelty, love and hate, light and dark.

A pretty good bit, actually.

Calaméo - Kaléidoscope - L'actualité des livres

The main reason I wanted to read this book was because of the relationship between Gwynplaine and Dea; their love and life together, and eventually, both of their deaths. I adore his devotion to her and her adoration of him, and their innocence is just so sweet and pure that it's extremely beautiful, she who's blind yet able to see beyond the deformed face of the man she loves, seeing his soul and true beauty.

I had read somewhere that the end was heartbreaking, and I had a feeling that Dea would die just from interpretation and from a certain name of one of the last chapters , but that didn't soften the blow of her death any less, and I couldn't believe the way she died: Gosh, I mean, they had finally just been reunited and it was so sweet! And Gwynplaine's reactions are so vivid and touching in these scenes; his tears and pleas for her to stay alive, and then his own suicide by walking off into the water and letting himself drown.


  1. The Betrayal.
  2. Five Little Monkeys Storybook Treasury (A Five Little Monkeys Story).
  3. L'homme qui rit!
  4. ?
  5. L'uomo che ride by Victor Hugo!
  6. The School of Niklaus Wirth: The Art of Simplicity.

It's strangely romantic; the classic love story, I guess you could say. Once I got into this, I began wondering if The Man Who Laughs would have sort of a Romeo and Juliet ending, and let me tell you, this is so much better than Shakespeare's work. On another subject, Ursus: I wonder how, or if, he was able to cope with both of them dying. Another point of the story I was drawn to was the treatment Gwynplaine receives by everyone else, the people who laugh upon seeing his face and the nobles who scorn him, even though he is revealed to be one of their peers, showing just how cruel mankind can be to anything different.

Overall, my favorite thing about this story was the love between Gwynplaine and Dea, the monster and angel, and also the love their father has for them. It's definitely one I'll read again, a story that's filled with vivid imagery and powerful words, emotions, and characters. Not an easy read, but very rewarding I have no doubt Hugo would be accused of socialism if he spoke up in modern times. But really he is anti-nobility and royalty, and uses his characters to speak up for the common man, as well as subtle digs at the rich and sheltered lords of 18th century England.

It's the story of man who goes from one extreme to the other, and not by his choosing. He's an amazingly complex character, as are many of the supporting char Not an easy read, but very rewarding He's an amazingly complex character, as are many of the supporting characters. And quite unusual as well Homo is a most excellent and well done character. As he tells this melodrama, Hugo spends chapter upon chapter informing the reader of those times And if you're a history buff, you'll gain some fascinating insights as well. Thanks to Trish for the recommendation! An odd yet oddly compelling historical romance set in 17th century England.

I have to admit that I've started this book because the movie was released in France, and I wanted to read it before watching it. I know, I know I should have read it before and not to wait that long especially after knowing how much I loved each Hugo's book I've read. I made the mistake to buy the long version and it took me ages to read it.

But I looooved it. This book estheticism is amazing, all the characters are wonderful, complex and touching, each one in its way. Some might not like it, because of it's darkness and how depressing it can be, but this is what I like with Hugo. How its work change after his daughter's death in especially after "Les Contemplations" published 13 years before "L'Homme qui Rit" is something that touches me a lot. I won't say much more, I don't want to use spoilers, so my last advice would be: Il racconto della prima notte dura centinaia di pagine, e non sono sprecate: I nobili si odiano, e quando decidono d'incontrarsi si divertono costringendo due poveretti a farsi pugili e massacrarsi a vicenda, sotto le grida delle loro eleganti scommesse e considerazioni da intenditori.

Altrove, Hugo ha preso di mira la monarchia; qui denuncia i vizi, la violenza dell'aristocrazia - e anche nel lusso di quei palazzi non si ha mai una sensazione di luce, ma d'ombra, d'asfissia, d'inganno. Band 2 setzt ca. Troppe pagine dedicate a chi ride, troppo poche quelle dedicate all'uomo che vorrebbe non farlo. Chi legge pensa, chi pensa ragiona.

See a Problem?

Vietom buvo tikrai nelengva. Bet visa visuma patiko. View all 4 comments. As much as I know about literature, I somehow never realized quite how wonderful Hugo's books are. One knows the stories and takes them for granted as cornerstones of 19th Century writing, but the joy of reading them or listening to them via Librivox far surpasses the mere plot elements. Encyclopedic, complex, and resolutely humanistic, they encompass vastly more than their plots.

From the chilling invention of the Comprachicos -- so awful a concept that it overshadows much of the book -- to t As much as I know about literature, I somehow never realized quite how wonderful Hugo's books are. From the chilling invention of the Comprachicos -- so awful a concept that it overshadows much of the book -- to the extended metaphor of the face of comedy carved at the behest of an evil king, the book is one terrific scene after another, woven together with historical detail, wonderful aphorisms, and characters who come vividly to life, detailed and believable in their flaws and virtues.

I liked this one a little less than Notre Dame because the long descriptions of peerage and the history of the English parliament were somewhat brain-glazing and the ending a tad too determined to be as tragic as it might possibly be. All is well; no, wait, it's not! Everything is actually awful -- the good are punished and the wicked go on their way. The poor suffer and the wealthy rise up. Certainly in keeping with Hugo's general worldview but not handled as deftly here as in Hunchback.

Then, in January, I saw a musical based on the tale while in London, became fascinated, and sought all film and literary versions.

This story is not readily available in an official translation. The only copies I could find were unaccredited translations in the public realm. As such, this translation feels a little clunky at times, but despite that, I still really enjoyed it. As always, Hugo goes off on the occasional tangent from the story, but in a mostly interesting way, and I simply adore the way he presents the relationship between Gwynplain and Dea, and Gwynplain's journey as he discovers the truth about his heritage.

I was in tears by the end.

L'uomo che ride

It is typical Hugo fare, with commentary on social injustice. I wouldn't recommend it as a first read to newcomers to his writing, but for seasoned readers, it's definitely worth your time. In the future, I would like to get hold of a copy in the original French and read it again without the stodgy translation. A boy who was disfigured as a political ploy returns to London as a mountebank and man of the people, triggering a tragic chain of events. If you've ever read The Pricess Bride the movie version doesn't cover this , then this is one of the writers that Goldman apparently mocked: I skimmed those parts.

If you're in the mood for a swoon or two, give it a go, but avoid if you're only reading it for the probable tie to the Joker from Batman.

Kaléidoscope - L'actualité des livres

Dominique Commentaires sources externes: Ursus, impuissant, ne peut qu'espionner de loin. May 23, J. I was intrigued by the premise The Man Who Laughs. Two-year-old Fermain is sold to Comprachicos—a Hugo invention based on the Spanish word for child-buyers, who mutilate his face into that of a perpetually laughing clown and force him to exhibit himself for money as a carnival freak.

He is abandoned eight years later and, while wandering through a snowstorm, happens across the corpse of a frozen woman clutching a nearly dead infant girl.