A Substitute Teachers Guide to Survival

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  1. Substitute Teacher’s Survival Guide: Survive & Thrive with your K-12s
  2. The Substitute Teaching Survival Guide, Grades K-5: Emergency Lesson Plans and Essential Advice
  3. Write Down the Plan
  4. Your Guide for Survival: Tips and Resources for Substitute Teachers | SubAssistant

Getting to know even a few of their names helps significantly. The ability to call them out by name is powerful. Another great strategy is having multiple strategies for distraction and motivation in the classroom. And, as bad as it sounds, a Netflix account comes in handy. Being an English nerd, I always had word games of some sort. Generally I just kept a folder with a few copies that I found online.

Jumbles, crosswords, Mad Libs…that sort of thing. Jennifer from Virginia has a good reminder about the kinds of games you bring into the classroom however:.

Substitute Teacher’s Survival Guide: Survive & Thrive with your K-12s

I like having games that can be easily adapted to a curriculum. Finally, Stephanie from Ontario has some words of wisdom for all teachers, new, old, substitute or regular:. Even if the last experience was less than positive, beginning with an open mind rather than waiting to see what goes wrong goes a long way!

Some key takeaways are:. A PhD, researcher and educator in the field of technology integration and digital identities, Kelsey Catherine explores the impact digital media has on young people, and what role youth culture has on classroom practice. She also spends far too much time playing League of Legends. You must be logged in to post a comment. Written by Kelsey Catherine Schmitz. Stacey from Ontario suggests: Lynn from Kingston suggests you may want to prepare differently for the age group you are teaching: Samara from Cornwall suggests that you may want to bring different resources for older students: Lindsey from Kingston uses a pretty effective routine for learning success: Ashley from Cornwall has a firm answer to that: David also had some games to recommend: Jennifer from Virginia has a good reminder about the kinds of games you bring into the classroom however: Finally, Stephanie from Ontario has some words of wisdom for all teachers, new, old, substitute or regular: Some key takeaways are: Show organization, punctuality and forethought to keep your edge Bring your own lessons or activities that can be a helping hand to managing the day Follow through and maintain your style of discipline Stay positive.

The Substitute Teaching Survival Guide, Grades K-5: Emergency Lesson Plans and Essential Advice

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Lecture 4 The Cons of Being a Substitute Teacher

Kelsey Catherine Schmitz A PhD, researcher and educator in the field of technology integration and digital identities, Kelsey Catherine explores the impact digital media has on young people, and what role youth culture has on classroom practice. Leave a Comment X You must be logged in to post a comment.

So, what is your role as a substitute teacher? Your role is carry on the program of the classroom teacher as closely as possible, with causing as little disruption as possible. Your job is to carry out her instructions, and get everything done that he has asked. Your job is also to keep the students in line, and out of trouble.

Other teachers will appreciate it if they do not have to come in and "look after" your class, for you. And lastly, it is your responsibility to report what happened during your day to the regular teacher. When you come into the classroom, you must establish an immediate presence within the room. First impressions are formed within seconds of meeting someone, and students need to get the impression that you are a "real teacher" and know what you are doing.

Let the students know you are in charge as soon as you walk in by developing a routine that you follow with every class. Here are some methods to help you develop that presence quickly:. Your routine may be different, but have a regular routine that works for you, and try to stick to it. One of the major disadvantages of coming in a supply teacher is that you don't know the students' names. Knowing their names is key in being to call out the miscreants and to gain the support of the strongest students. Here is a little trick I started doing in my classes that helped to overcome the problem of trying to teach these nameless, anonymous students.

Write Down the Plan

Make them name signs. Now, whenever you would like a particular student to do something, or stop doing something, use their name. It makes you much more credible and authoritative in the classroom. As well, it allows to let the classroom teacher what has happened for the day, by reporting names. Now, subs know there are all kinds of teachers out there: You want to teach for the detailed ones. These are the ones who think of everything and their plan is long enough to cover you all the way through class. This is very important. Even if it's not your style of teaching, or what you agree with, it's not your job to change it.

Follow it and you will make your returning teacher very happy. If you are not able to finish everything on the list, explain why you could not to the teacher. Do not leave things out arbitrarily, however. Your classroom teacher has likely spent a lot of time planning out his unit, and this day needs to fit as closely as possible into the rest of the unit.

As hard as you might try to follow the plan, you may have to improvise slightly, in order to make something work. If you simply cannot understand the directions given, don't just throw them out. Instead, improvise and do something similar. If you finish the plan, and then have nothing to do, that is where the emergency strategies come in. There are a number of resources out there to help you in this instance. Be sure to always carry a package of supplies to help in those down times.

It's also good to have some quick activities you can do with the students for a few minutes at the end of class. It is also wise to have some word search puzzles or crossword puzzles in your bag. Extra age and subject appropriate worksheets are also very good to have in your emergency stash, such as multiplication sheets or vocabulary questions. After you have done your class, be sure to write up a report to the classroom teacher. Start the report by thanking the teacher for the opportunity to fill in for her.

After that, let the teacher know what aspects of plan was covered. If you had to make any changes, explain what they were, and why you chose to change the plan. As well, inform the teacher of any student misbehaviour, along with any actions that you took to deal with the situation.

Attach any student work to the report and leave this report in the teacher's mail box, if applicable. If the school does not have mailboxes, leave the report in a visible spot on the desk. If you have done a good job by establishing your presence, following the plan, and being prepared for contingencies, it is likely that you may get a call again. If the teacher likes you, she may request you by name. If you are doing this as a career, have some substitute teacher business cards made up and leave one with the teacher beside the report.

Your professionalism will make an impression! You have no business teaching unless you like kids, so enjoy them and all the craziness that they bring. Sure, some days will be stressful and you will have challenges, but have fun and realize that you are taking part in an important endeavour: As well, enjoy being a substitute because you won't have to do lesson planning or mark papers. You can go in for the day, and leave the little darlings for the regular teacher to deal with the next day.

Substitute teaching is quite an exciting job, and I wish you all the best in your chosen field. Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites. Kashmir, I hope it does help out some fellow teachers.

1. Know Your Role

It can be pretty intimidating when you first start out. It's so nice to see you! Thanks for the lovely comment! All great information and advice to help all those who will be a substitute teacher now or sometime in the future. Billy, you were indeed blessed! Thanks for your endorsement: In eighteen years of teaching I was lucky enough never to substitute. I filled in for fellow teachers often but those were kids I knew because I worked there. I have the utmost respect for subs; it is at times a thankless job.

Your Guide for Survival: Tips and Resources for Substitute Teachers | SubAssistant

Great suggestions and I completely agree with them and endorse them. Phdast, thank you so much for sharing and for your kind comment. I hope it is useful to those going out to the schools. Great Hub and great advice. You covered everything and provided a structure and guidelines for those who find themselves substitute teaching. Other product and company names shown may be trademarks of their respective owners.

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