Antipodes: Memories and Thoughts of a Vietnam War Combat Soldier

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Antipodes: Memories and Thoughts of a Vietnam War Combat Soldier file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Antipodes: Memories and Thoughts of a Vietnam War Combat Soldier book. Happy reading Antipodes: Memories and Thoughts of a Vietnam War Combat Soldier Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Antipodes: Memories and Thoughts of a Vietnam War Combat Soldier at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Antipodes: Memories and Thoughts of a Vietnam War Combat Soldier Pocket Guide.

Articles

  1. wars, spaces and bodies
  2. Vietnam | geographical imaginations

He tells a compelling story in fluent, vivid, and even lyrical prose, expressing compassionate insight into both society and ecosystem. Tucker, University of Michigan. You can now access the THOR databases — and find the backstory — here. He knew there was an easier way. The result was impressive: THOR cut the report work from three days to just under an hour. After receiving Department of Defense approvals, Robertson was able to post THOR files online so interested public citizens could search the data for their own purposes.

Robertson understands the vast potential benefits of opening such a large compilation of previously inaccessible data to the public. One of the first once forbidden fruits of releasing this data to the public is a remarkable map by Cooper Thomas plotting 3.

In addition, I had been looking to seed an open data effort at DoD. The beta site is a working proof-of-concept. The next step is to show the larger DoD community that open data merits investment. Our approach is unique in two ways. We will quickly iterate and improve the data offerings on data. Our goal is to provide all data with enough context that users, both the public and defense employees, can understand the potential value and get started using data quickly.

The Department of Defense regularly reports on the significant challenges we face in defending the nation, which range from attracting talented recruits to developing game-changing technology within constrained budgets. Most of these aspects of defense business generate large amounts of unclassified data which, if released, can encourage collaboration and innovation with public and private sector partners.

The site is built using an open data storytelling platform, LiveStorie s. Rather than simply posting a list of datasets, the goal of Data. The site provides narratives to complement the data so users can more quickly understand and begin using it. LiveStories was selected for its visualization and data analysis features allowing us to present an engaging site for its users.

wars, spaces and bodies

Non-technical staff can use the platform to share their data and tell their stories. We want to compel collaboration from military components, industry partners and the public. The partnership with data. As the origins of Project THOR show, there are crucial links between retrospective reporting and prospective mission planning.

Some days had as many as 1, missions, while the records for some days are completely missing. The colors of each of the circles dictates what type of mission took place. The GIF is here ; screenshot from the interactive:. Vietnam and the memory of war just out from Harvard:. All wars are fought twice, the first time on the battlefield, the second time in memory. From the author of the bestselling novel The Sympathizer comes a searching exploration of the conflict Americans call the Vietnam War and Vietnamese call the American War — a conflict that lives on in the collective memory of both nations.

From a kaleidoscope of cultural forms — novels, memoirs, cemeteries, monuments, films, photography, museum exhibits, video games, souvenirs, and more — Nothing Ever Dies brings a comprehensive vision of the war into sharp focus. At stake are ethical questions about how the war should be remembered by participants that include not only Americans and Vietnamese but also Laotians, Cambodians, South Koreans, and Southeast Asian Americans.

Visiting sites across the United States, Southeast Asia, and Korea, Viet Thanh Nguyen provides penetrating interpretations of the way memories of the war help to enable future wars or struggle to prevent them. Drawing from this war, Nguyen offers a lesson for all wars by calling on us to recognize not only our shared humanity but our ever-present inhumanity.

This is the only path to reconciliation with our foes, and with ourselves. Prologue Just Memory Ethics 1. On Remembering Others 3. On the Inhumanities Industries 4. On War Machines 5. On Becoming Human 6. On Asymmetry Aesthetics 7. On Victims and Voices 8. On True War Stories 9. Why would these men — many of them combat veterans of Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan haunted by their own experiences on the frontline — try to recreate a war that so many have tried to forget?

Unlike most war re-enactments, the pretend battles they stage are private, free of spectators and created for the experience of the participants alone. Outfitted in authentic period military gear, the men hike through the woods for days at a time, sleep on the ground, eat canned rations and carry actual Vietnam-era weapons loaded with blanks.

Most remarkable perhaps is how this unusual hobby brings combat veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan together with civilians and veterans of Vietnam. They work collectively to create a fascinating space where real emotions and memories mix with history and fantasy. Their reasons for participating vary: Some seek the camaraderie they experienced in their deployment, while others want to relive a vital time in their life.

And for all of the veterans involved, it is an event at which their service is acknowledged and respected. As you can see from this contemporary Army video, the concept was claimed as revolutionary and, in its way of course, counter-revolutionary. What interests me here, though, is another capacity, and one without which the potential of air mobility would have remained unrealised. Simply by speaking a few words into a two-way radio, I had performed magical feats of destruction. Summoned by my voice, jet fighters appeared in the sky to loose their lethal droppings on villages and men.

High-explosive bombs blasted houses to fragments, napalm sucked air from lungs and turned human flesh to ashes. All this just by saying a few words into a radio transmitter. But the radio was part of a much wider network of military violence and military logistics in Vietnam. Here is Frederick Downs in The killing zone:. With the radio, we grunts could make use of modern weapons. Without it, everything stayed put. We used the radio to call in artillery, naval gun support if it was close enough, air strikes, gunships, dustoffs, Puff the Magic Dragon [the AC gunship], mortars, tanks, APCs and other rifle platoons.

The radio kept us supplied. One day our order went in; the next day the chopper flew out with a delivery. We found each other by using grid coordinates and radioing them back and forth.

A pilot knew he had the right location when we popped smoke and he identified it over the radio. By this method, we received C rations, ammo, new weapons, grenades, parts for our equipment, shoes, new clothes, underwear, socks, medicine, personnel replacements, beer, iodine tablets for use in the water, mail, and once in a while even a chaplain. To complete the cycle, the radio was used to extract us from trouble. Saving a life was often a matter of seconds.

The radio was also a comfort at night. The periodic radio checks assured us that friends and help were always near. Here too, incidentally, there are lessons for contemporary analysis: Ground operations in Afghanistan and elsewhere would also be virtually impossible without their radio links. You can find a detailed technical specification here , but here are the key passages:. It actually weighed slightly more than that, Metal buckles held the two together. The radio was tough and would easily survive a 50 foot fall from a helicopter onto a metal-planked runway.

You could throw the whole thing in the water for an hour, completely submerged, then pull it out and expect it to work…. There were actually two antennas, a regular one and a long-range antenna, carried in a canvas bag strapped to the side of the radio The radio had a transmission range, with the short antenna, of about miles, but various terrain factors could influence this, of course. It helped to be higher up. The long range antenna was supposed to be good for up to 18 miles. The rule of thumb was that the battery was good for about a day of casual operation, listening mostly, some occasional transmissions.

Spare batteries were usually kept in a spare. When expended, the battery pack had to be physically destroyed.

Inside were flashlight-type batteries which the Viet Cong could use in booby traps or to ignite bombardment rockets. Notice first the extraordinary weight of the thing. He also had to contend with a difficult load distribution: Then notice the size of the aerial above ; RTOs carried a ten-feet rigid mast in sections but much of the time used a three-feet whip antenna. This made the RTO extremely vulnerable: Right away he demanded I stuff the flexible, three-foot whip antenna down my shirt to limit me and by extension him as a target.

He knew a priority of the enemy was to knock out communication, and our commo was located on my back. I complied with his directive but made the mistake of telling him our signal strength would suffer. In no uncertain words he told me never to question him again.

Even with a network of relay stations and airborne retransmissions, communications were uneven and intermittent: At night even a whisper was dangerous; here is John Edmund Delezen:. Hourly situation reports are sent to the radio relay atop of Hill some three kilometers north of the Khe Sanh airstrip. The two small audible clicks are all that connects us with the world, and all that assures the relay that we have not disappeared into the liquid black night.

It could be strangely remote for those receiving the transmissions too above, an artillery fire support center. The result is a richly textured history of militarized landscapes that reveals the spatial logic of key battles such as the Tet Offensive. This personal and multilayered approach yields an innovative history of the lasting traces of war in Vietnam and a model for understanding other militarized landscapes. His nuanced use of Vietnamese-language publications and his extensive interviews with local people are outstanding. He tells a compelling story in fluent, vivid, and even lyrical prose, expressing compassionate insight into both society and ecosystem.

Tucker, University of Michigan. You can now access the THOR databases — and find the backstory — here. He knew there was an easier way. The result was impressive: THOR cut the report work from three days to just under an hour. After receiving Department of Defense approvals, Robertson was able to post THOR files online so interested public citizens could search the data for their own purposes. Robertson understands the vast potential benefits of opening such a large compilation of previously inaccessible data to the public.

One of the first once forbidden fruits of releasing this data to the public is a remarkable map by Cooper Thomas plotting 3. In addition, I had been looking to seed an open data effort at DoD. The beta site is a working proof-of-concept. The next step is to show the larger DoD community that open data merits investment. Our approach is unique in two ways.

We will quickly iterate and improve the data offerings on data. Our goal is to provide all data with enough context that users, both the public and defense employees, can understand the potential value and get started using data quickly. The Department of Defense regularly reports on the significant challenges we face in defending the nation, which range from attracting talented recruits to developing game-changing technology within constrained budgets.

Most of these aspects of defense business generate large amounts of unclassified data which, if released, can encourage collaboration and innovation with public and private sector partners. The site is built using an open data storytelling platform, LiveStorie s. Rather than simply posting a list of datasets, the goal of Data. The site provides narratives to complement the data so users can more quickly understand and begin using it. LiveStories was selected for its visualization and data analysis features allowing us to present an engaging site for its users.

Non-technical staff can use the platform to share their data and tell their stories.

We want to compel collaboration from military components, industry partners and the public. The partnership with data. As the origins of Project THOR show, there are crucial links between retrospective reporting and prospective mission planning. Some days had as many as 1, missions, while the records for some days are completely missing.

The colors of each of the circles dictates what type of mission took place. The GIF is here ; screenshot from the interactive:. Vietnam and the memory of war just out from Harvard:. All wars are fought twice, the first time on the battlefield, the second time in memory. From the author of the bestselling novel The Sympathizer comes a searching exploration of the conflict Americans call the Vietnam War and Vietnamese call the American War — a conflict that lives on in the collective memory of both nations.

From a kaleidoscope of cultural forms — novels, memoirs, cemeteries, monuments, films, photography, museum exhibits, video games, souvenirs, and more — Nothing Ever Dies brings a comprehensive vision of the war into sharp focus. At stake are ethical questions about how the war should be remembered by participants that include not only Americans and Vietnamese but also Laotians, Cambodians, South Koreans, and Southeast Asian Americans.

Visiting sites across the United States, Southeast Asia, and Korea, Viet Thanh Nguyen provides penetrating interpretations of the way memories of the war help to enable future wars or struggle to prevent them. Drawing from this war, Nguyen offers a lesson for all wars by calling on us to recognize not only our shared humanity but our ever-present inhumanity. This is the only path to reconciliation with our foes, and with ourselves. Prologue Just Memory Ethics 1.

On Remembering Others 3. On the Inhumanities Industries 4. On War Machines 5. On Becoming Human 6. On Asymmetry Aesthetics 7. On Victims and Voices 8. On True War Stories 9. Why would these men — many of them combat veterans of Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan haunted by their own experiences on the frontline — try to recreate a war that so many have tried to forget?

Unlike most war re-enactments, the pretend battles they stage are private, free of spectators and created for the experience of the participants alone. Outfitted in authentic period military gear, the men hike through the woods for days at a time, sleep on the ground, eat canned rations and carry actual Vietnam-era weapons loaded with blanks. Most remarkable perhaps is how this unusual hobby brings combat veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan together with civilians and veterans of Vietnam. They work collectively to create a fascinating space where real emotions and memories mix with history and fantasy.

Their reasons for participating vary: Some seek the camaraderie they experienced in their deployment, while others want to relive a vital time in their life. And for all of the veterans involved, it is an event at which their service is acknowledged and respected. As you can see from this contemporary Army video, the concept was claimed as revolutionary and, in its way of course, counter-revolutionary. What interests me here, though, is another capacity, and one without which the potential of air mobility would have remained unrealised. Simply by speaking a few words into a two-way radio, I had performed magical feats of destruction.

Vietnam | geographical imaginations

Summoned by my voice, jet fighters appeared in the sky to loose their lethal droppings on villages and men. High-explosive bombs blasted houses to fragments, napalm sucked air from lungs and turned human flesh to ashes. All this just by saying a few words into a radio transmitter. But the radio was part of a much wider network of military violence and military logistics in Vietnam. Here is Frederick Downs in The killing zone:. With the radio, we grunts could make use of modern weapons. Without it, everything stayed put.

We used the radio to call in artillery, naval gun support if it was close enough, air strikes, gunships, dustoffs, Puff the Magic Dragon [the AC gunship], mortars, tanks, APCs and other rifle platoons.


  • wars, spaces and bodies.
  • .
  • .
  • Night Shift: The Jill Kismet Books: Book One.
  • .
  • The Vets Daughter: A Virago Modern Classic (Virago Modern Classics Book 95).

The radio kept us supplied. One day our order went in; the next day the chopper flew out with a delivery. We found each other by using grid coordinates and radioing them back and forth. A pilot knew he had the right location when we popped smoke and he identified it over the radio. By this method, we received C rations, ammo, new weapons, grenades, parts for our equipment, shoes, new clothes, underwear, socks, medicine, personnel replacements, beer, iodine tablets for use in the water, mail, and once in a while even a chaplain.

To complete the cycle, the radio was used to extract us from trouble. Saving a life was often a matter of seconds. The radio was also a comfort at night. The periodic radio checks assured us that friends and help were always near. Here too, incidentally, there are lessons for contemporary analysis: Ground operations in Afghanistan and elsewhere would also be virtually impossible without their radio links. You can find a detailed technical specification here , but here are the key passages:. It actually weighed slightly more than that, Metal buckles held the two together.

The radio was tough and would easily survive a 50 foot fall from a helicopter onto a metal-planked runway. You could throw the whole thing in the water for an hour, completely submerged, then pull it out and expect it to work…. There were actually two antennas, a regular one and a long-range antenna, carried in a canvas bag strapped to the side of the radio The radio had a transmission range, with the short antenna, of about miles, but various terrain factors could influence this, of course.

It helped to be higher up. The long range antenna was supposed to be good for up to 18 miles. The rule of thumb was that the battery was good for about a day of casual operation, listening mostly, some occasional transmissions. Spare batteries were usually kept in a spare. When expended, the battery pack had to be physically destroyed. Inside were flashlight-type batteries which the Viet Cong could use in booby traps or to ignite bombardment rockets. Notice first the extraordinary weight of the thing. He also had to contend with a difficult load distribution: Then notice the size of the aerial above ; RTOs carried a ten-feet rigid mast in sections but much of the time used a three-feet whip antenna.

This made the RTO extremely vulnerable: Right away he demanded I stuff the flexible, three-foot whip antenna down my shirt to limit me and by extension him as a target. He knew a priority of the enemy was to knock out communication, and our commo was located on my back. I complied with his directive but made the mistake of telling him our signal strength would suffer. In no uncertain words he told me never to question him again.

Even with a network of relay stations and airborne retransmissions, communications were uneven and intermittent: At night even a whisper was dangerous; here is John Edmund Delezen:.