Media,Technology and Society: A History: From the Telegraph to the Internet

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Contents

  1. Project MUSE - Media Technology and Society: A History: From the Telegraph to the Internet (review)
  2. Additional Information
  3. SearchWorks Catalog
  4. Stanford Libraries

Mechanically Scanned Television 6. Electronically Scanned Television 7. The First Computers Suppressing the Mainframes The Integrated Circuit The Coming of the Microcomputer Part Four: The Intricate Web of Trails The Beginnings of Networks The Satellite Era Nielsen Book Data Publisher's Summary Media Technology and Society offers a comprehensive account of the history of communications technologies, from the telegraph to the internet.

Project MUSE - Media Technology and Society: A History: From the Telegraph to the Internet (review)

Winston argues that the development of new media, from the telephone to computers, satellite, and CD-Rom, is the product of a constant play-off between social necessity and suppression: Winston's fascinating account challenges the concept of a 'revolution' in communications technology by highlighting the long histories of such developments. The fax was introduced in The idea of television was patented in Digitalization was demonstrated in Even the concept of the 'web' dates back to From the Telegraph to the Internet.

The history books tell us that Samuel Morse "invented" the.


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That was, Brian Winston. Victoria had given birth traveled on a telegraph wire from. It was nineteen years after a Russian. Francis Ronalds succeeded in transmitting information.

One of Winston's goals in his information-rich new book,. Another is to demonstrate that societies shape their.

Admiralty as "wholly unnecessary" and therefore went. The "supervening necessity" -- the societal force. All this leads to a larger and more controversial point.


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Winston, who is head of the School. Westminster, not only has a go at that old [ital]bete.

Additional Information

For those of us who have read Winston's stimulating In this substantial new work he clarifies and. A detailed model of historical change in. Such repression of dangerous new inventions was the major. Journal of Interdisciplinary History From the Telegraph to the Internet.

SearchWorks Catalog

By Brian Winston London, Routledge, pp. Time and time again, new technologies emerge more slowly than their champions dreamed, while powerful social forces defuse their radical import. The "primacy of the social sphere" is inescapable and continuity always wins out over change [End Page ] 2. Ergo, there never has been, and presumably never can be, an information revolution.

Stanford Libraries

To sustain this hypothesis, Winston organizes his book around case studies of the early development of various communications innovations, including the telegraph, the telephone, radio, television, computers, satellites, and the internet. With predictable regularity, each innovation fell into the clutches of corporate managers who, through a combination of stubbornness, self-interest, and political savvy, blunted its creative potential. Thorstein Veblen could not have put it any better.

Winston's account serves as a corrective to the inflated, sometimes millennial, claims that new media technologies routinely spawn.


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Yet, he aspires to do more than merely second-guess business journalists, cultural critics, and media gurus. His aim is to write a major interdisciplinary work of social history. Unfortunately, he falls considerably short of his goal. Had Winston worked more closely with historians of technology--or at least mastered more of their scholarship--he might have avoided the factual and interpretive errors that litter the text.