The Sheriffs Bluff 1908

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  1. Thomas Nelson Page
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  4. SHOT MAN PROVE FATAL — Red Bluff News 22 May — California Digital Newspaper Collection

In the following investigation by the Tupiza police, the bandits were identified as the men who robbed the Aramayo payroll transport, but the Bolivian authorities didn't know their real names, nor could they positively identify them. The bodies were buried at the small San Vicente cemetery, near the grave of a German miner named Gustav Zimmer. Although attempts have been made to find their unmarked graves, notably by the American forensic anthropologist Clyde Snow and his researchers in , no remains with DNA matching the living relatives of Cassidy and Longabaugh have yet been discovered.

In a new search was launched for the grave of Cassidy. It zeroed in on a mine outside Goodsprings, NV. DNA was taken from a nephew of his via birth by Cassidy's Sister.

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The dig managed to find human remains, but did not match the DNA provided. Smith stated that he had just seen Cassidy who told him that his face had been altered by a surgeon in Paris , and that he showed Smith a repaired bullet wound that Smith recognized as work he had previously done on Cassidy. In a interview, Josie Bassett claimed that Cassidy came to visit her in the s "after returning from South America," and that "Butch died in Johnnie, Nevada, [25] about 15 years ago. A History of Butch Cassidy and His Wild Bunch , by observing that if Cassidy "is still alive, as these rumors claim, it seems exceedingly strange that he has not returned to Circleville, Utah, to visit his old father, Maximillian Parker, who died on July 28, , at the age of 94 years.

A second-season episode of the television series In Search of In a series of interviews with residents of Baggs, Wyoming , a popular destination for the Wild Bunch during their raiding years, Cassidy was said to have visited for several days in , driving a Ford Model T. Among the residents interviewed is the town sheriff, Ross Moore, who claims it was common knowledge locally that Cassidy did not die in South America, stating that his own grandmother saw Cassidy in In the episode, author John Rolfe Burroughs [29] recounts several interviews he reportedly conducted in the s supporting the claims of a visit by Parker to Baggs, Wyoming.

Notably, this episode also interviews Cassidy's sister, Lula Parker Betenson d. Betenson states that Cassidy picked up his brother Mark Parker in a Ford automobile, then drove to the home of their father Maximillian Parker, [31] where Betenson also lived. She reports the elder Parker having said to her "I'll bet you don't know who this is.

This is your brother Robert Leroy. Jameson in Butch Cassidy: Phillips claimed to have known Butch Cassidy since childhood. Wilcox, a previously unknown associate of Butch Cassidy. Observing the similarities between the two men, he revised his previous theory and concluded that Phillips was in fact Wilcox, and not Butch Cassidy. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see Butch Cassidy disambiguation. Beaver, Utah Territory , United States. This section does not cite any sources.

Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. January Learn how and when to remove this template message. This section may contain indiscriminate , excessive , or irrelevant examples. Please improve the article by adding more descriptive text and removing less pertinent examples. See Wikipedia's guide to writing better articles for further suggestions. Bureau of Land Management. Accessed 13 June Retrieved 27 February Archived from the original on Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel. Archived from the original on 2 April Retrieved 28 February Geordie lass Ann Sinclair Gillies who was born and bred on Tyneside Retrieved 10 April American outlaw Butch Cassidy may be a US hero but newly discovered records show he had Geordie heritage.

New American Library Penguin. Archived at the Wayback Machine. Butch Cassidy is Pardoned, ". Public Archives and Research Library, inmate files: The New York Times. Wyoming Tales and Trails. Retrieved September 22, Annals of the Former World. Butch Cassidy, My Brother. Butch Cassidy's Surrender Offer.

In Search of Butch Cassidy. University of Oklahoma Press. Retrieved December 17, Internet Movie Data Base. Retrieved July 15, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid ". Retrieved April 15, Retrieved April 12, John Jacob Astor William H. Davis George Flavel C. Western genre Western lifestyle Western wear. Anchorage Iditarod Nome Seward Skagway. Creede Denver Telluride Trinidad. Fort Boise Fort Hall. Independence Kansas City St. Carson City Virginia City Reno. Everett Port Townsend Seattle Vancouver. Fort Bridger Fort Laramie. Retrieved from " https: Her face is exceedingly intelligent.

She has strong jaws, with a delicate mouth, and cheek bones that are not so prominent as is usual in Indian faces. Her forehead is rather low, but broad, and her eyes are large and expressive. Her glossy black hair was gathered in a Grecian coil at the back, which showed the outline of her shapely head.

She has easy command of colloquial English, and frequently expresses herself forcibly and eloquently. It has been falsely said that the Pyramid Lake Reservation is rich in game and good lands. That was the representation made to the authorities at Washington when we were driven from the Malhuer Reservation. General Sheridan asked me, a short time ago, if our reservation did not afford us a good living. I told him that high bleak hills that only a goat could safely climb rose out of the water all around the lake; that the only arable lands were four acres on the river.

He seemed astonished at the revelation, for he feels very kindly toward my people. They would all surely have perished long ago if their life-long experience with hardship had not inured them to scant food and exposure to cold. It is snowing now, doubtless, on their reservation, the lake and river are full of ice, yet they have no shelter except the wigwams, made of reeds and tule, no clothing save the bit of calico or blanket that they have picked up.

Some of the young men herd cattle in Summer or work on farms near the reservation, and in that way they get a little money to buy blankets for the Winter; but they are the fortunate few. The rest have little to protect them from the cold. The latter is the only game on the whole reservation, and you may imagine how quickly they will disappear when hunted by 7, starving Indians. My people are suffering for it now. But they never do anything for the Indians. They live in idleness and draw their salaries regularly. The carpenter has not driven a nail for months; the teachers have never given a lesson; the blacksmith rarely lights a fire in his forge, and the farmer plows only for the white people.

If a conspiracy were formed by the most cunning men to desert and neglect the Indians on our reservation, it could not succeed better than the selfish policy of Bill Gibson, the agent, and his hungry relations. Where it has been side-tracked on its journey from Washington I do not know. They are allowed to trade only with the settlers of the reservation. They but their fish at 5 or 6 cents a pound and sell it for 15 to 18 cents. They bring in a load of fish and the settler goes through the form of putting them on the scales and then tosses the Indian a silver dollar or two and goes off satisfied.

Everyone connected with the agency is wholly devoid of conscience. They are there to get rich. There are people there who steal everything that the Government sends to us. They steal everything that the Indians own, and they run their cattle on our reservation, driving ours and the game off. It is a wretched state of affairs. They are not a roaming, shiftless, lazy people. They want to work in the Summer they take it eagerly. If we could only get a start in agriculture, if we could only get arable land, we could take care of ourselves, but we have been driven from good land to worse, till now we are on about as bleak and barren a spot as there is in the whole state of Nevada.

Image from the National Park Service. A Lovelock correspondent, under date of the 1st instant, writes to the [Silver State] as follows: Naches offers to donate a acre tract for that purpose. The Princess will canvass among her eastern friends for their support and influence in trying to get Government aid towards the building of such an institution.

There are some Indian children within the country to be educated, and Sarah believes in educating them at home. They learn rapidly at almost any school under proper treatment, but the right place to teach them is at home in their own State amid the surroundings of their childhood, with their parents, not among strangers in some distant land. Experience has taught her what her young people need, and the Government should make an appropriation and place her at the head of an Indian industrial school.

So far she has conducted her school here without Government aid, having received assistance from her eastern friends, among them that grand old lady — Miss Peabody. Davis, of the Grand Junction School, with several Indian pupils, will leave here to-morrow morning for home. He expected to take with him at least forty recruits for his excellent school. He would have done so had not Piute Natchez, and his lovely relative the far-famed Princess Sarah Winnemucca, interposed a veto. This latter idolized friend of Mrs. She dislikes the Government and the dislike is mutual.

Princess Sarah Winnemucca came in from Humboldt last evening and had a long talk with Johnson Sides and other Piutes relative to the fraudulent prophet of Walker River, who is telling the Indians of that locality that the braves of former ages are soon to reappear on the earth to destroy all Indians who have adopted the habits of white people. Sarah and all the better informed of her tribe do not believe in any such foolishness. She reports that she has fifteen or sixteen pupils, and is getting along nicely. A council of Shoshone Indian braves was held at Elko last week. Tuscarora Jake, the Indian thug, is in jail for the murder of two members of his tribe.

The relatives and friends of Jake offered to give the relatives of the murdered men a certain number of ponies, blankets and money if they would consent to have him set at liberty, and to put up a number of ponies as indemnity for the future good behavior of Jake. The relatives of the murdered men refused the offer, and said that Jake ought to be hanged, as he not only killed members of his own tribe, but a Chinaman also, for which another and an innocent Indian was sent to State Prison.

The head men of the tribe concluded that Jake should be punished as an example and a warning to Indians who are disposed, while drunk, to murder members of their own tribe or others who happen in their way. They think Jake is guilty of a cold-blooded murder and ought to be publicly hanged, so that Indians and whites could see him die.

Sarah Winnemucca and Nachez attended the council. Princess Sarah Winnemucca, who died recently in Montana, was a remarkable woman in many respects, and a prominent feature in the Indian relations of the Pacific Coast for the past quarter of a century. She had but one idea, and that was the civilization of her people. She was the daughter of old Chief Winnemucca, of the great Piute tribe, which included the Bannocks, Sheep-eaters, Weisers, Malheurs and the Snake River Indians, who committed so many depredations in early days in Oregon and Idaho.

Winnemucca and her whole family were ever true to the whites, and so far as their jurisdiction extended forced their tribes to peace. Parker, editor of the Walla Walla Statesman, tell how she saved his life and that of his companions in the Malheur country in the spring of Sarah was then on her way to the Malheur reservation in the vain endeavor to prevent the reservation Indians there from going on the warpath with Buffalo Horn. One night one of the horses of her team got away, and to help her out we loaned a young fellow, who was along with her, one of our horses to hunt the lost one.

Charles Robinson of this city and a boy were along with us at the time, and for the help we rendered her we always gave credit for saving our little company from being killed. The Indians had already donned their war paint and we were in their midst. The very day we arrived on the reservation everything was looking dark. Sarah was all the time in consultation with Chief Egan, and sent for us. Going to her wickiup, she introduced Eagan, and intimated that we had better get, and stand not upon the order of getting.

As we only had one gun among our crowd, the advice was taken. When the war ended she was in great demand by the Interior Department authorities, and did good work in having the remnants of her tribe removed to various other reservations where they could do no mischief. She was the only Indian on this coast who ever took any prominent part in settling the Indian question, and as such her memory should be respected.

Parker could not have known old Winnemucca very well, for a more treacherous wretch never lived. We called her Sarah Winnemucca, of the mint family? Well, Toc-me-to- which means shell-flower. Have you ever seen these flowers growing in an old garden among their many cousins of the mint family? Well, Tocme-to-ne loved them of all flowers best, for was she not herself a shell-flower?

Her people were Piute Indians, and they lived in every part of what is now the great state of Nevada. They wear their own flowers, too, and after they have sung together for a while one will dance off on the grass by herself while all the boys and girls look on and she sings:.

The grown-up people watch, too, as their children play, and Toc-me-to ne was never happier than when, light as a bird, she danced and sang her shellflower song:. Then after the plays and dancing the children had all sorts of good things to eat, and the flower festival was over for a year. Only three times did Toc-me-to-ne take part in the flower festival, for when she was quite a little girl, her grandfather, Chief Winnemucca, took his family and went to live in California, and when they came back she was almost grown up.

Her grandfather was very fond of her, and called her sweetheart, so she was sad and lonesome indeed when he left her and went to the Happy Spirit Land; but she did not forget his last words to her before he went.

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In California the old chief gave to grandchildren new names — Natchez, Lee, Mary and Sarah, and Sarah learned to speak fairly good English. Later, when she came to Pyramid lake, she played with Mr. Ormsby taught her to cook and sew and to do housework. When Sarah was fifteen years old she made the long mile journey to California once more with her brother and sister and her grandmother. Her brothers took care of cattle for good Mr.

Scott, who had known and loved Chief Winnemucca, and he gave them good wages, several fine horses, and two ponies for Sarah and Mary to ride. The sisters had always ridden bareback like Indian men, but when Christmas came Sarah was surprised to find a beautiful Mexican side-saddle from her brother Lee, and she learned to ride like the white ladies, and was very proud and happy.

Now the Piutes always would wander about. They lived by hunting and fishing, not by farming, so they moved from place to place wherever there was game. When they were in the mountains rough white settlers came to Pyramid lake and caught almost all of the fish with nets, so that there were no fish when the Indians returned.

This made the Indians angry, and so trouble began. All this time Sarah was in California. Her father, Chief Winnemucca Second, and her mother were in Nevada, and she often heard good news from them, but one spring when she was seventeen years old two Indians came bringing the news from her father that he was in the mountains and wanted all his children to come to him, but especially Sarah.

Starting on their ponies they began the journey, riding beside the wagon where the grandmother rode. It took twenty-five days to reach Carson City, but here their father and mother met them, and next day all went to see Gov. Nye, whom Sarah told in English what her father, the chief, wanted to say. Nye was very jolly and good, and when he knew how things really were he told the white settlers not to interfere with the Indians, and sent soldiers from the fort to drive the rough men away; so Gov. Nye and Chief Winnemucca became good friends, as they never could have been but for little Toc-me-to-ne and her bright interpretations.

For the next year Sarah talked both Piute and English, and settled many little troubles. Image from Nephilim Skulls International. AP — Times are tough for the legendary red-haired cannibal giants whose alleged existence here centuries ago has been debated for nearly years. Chemical staining by earth after burial was advanced as a likely reason why mummified remains have red hair instead of black like most Indians in the area. Anthropologists say the story, while somewhat tamer, is still fascinating. But they concede the old myth has more appeal and, no matter what they say, will probably persist.

Brooks says her initial investigation shows some of the bones were from cows, not giants. She told of a strange, red-haired tribe of cannibals her ancestors drove into a cave and suffocated by lighting a fire at its entrance. Reid, a Lovelock, mining engineer, said Indians took him to the cave in and told him the same tale. But when he entered the cave he found nothing but tons of bat guano. Reid was unsuccessful in getting an archeological dig started immediately.

But miners realizing the value of guano as fertilizer started hauling it out in They promptly turned up bones, baskets, weapons, tools, duck decoys, various other artifacts and what they described as a 6-foot-8 red-haired mummy. That spurred the first archeological dig in A second dig took place in Thousands of artifacts and about 60 average-height mummies were recovered.

More studies followed, including radio-carbon dating which showed the cave was occupied from about 2, BC to about AD. American Tobacco Company Wiki link. American Tobacco — Downtown Durham — History.

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These strange cases were reported by Dr. The disorder was canker sores in the mouth and on the tongue. They developed a few days after smoking was stopped. The mayor and city officials all Were summoned at once to the City Hall, The police were ordered to be within call, Armed, cap-a-pie, with powder and ball; A resolution was passed expressing regrets That wicked Bill Zingg had sold cigarettes.

Grand Army week at Washington opened fair and the weather generally was pleasant during the national Encampment. All day and night of Monday the streets were alive with marching men, G. Despite all the exertions that the railroad companies made to handle the crowds promptly, the visitors were from two to twelve hours late in reaching the city; but as rapidly as possible the trains were rolling into the city and unloading their human freight. The passengers accepted the situation with the best possible grace, and whatever the measure of their discontent it was all dissipated upon arriving at the Capitol, as they looked upon the generous and artistic manifestations of welcome and found themselves surrounded with reminiscences of the war and in the society of those whose friendship was knit in the blood and smoke of battle.

Tuesday was the great day of the reunion, with its grand parade, intended to be in commemoration of the grand review of Fifty thousand Union survivors of the great struggle marched over the identical route taken on that memorable occasion. Thirty thousand other wearers of the Grand Army badge or button, withholding themselves from the procession for various reasons, stood along the curbs or sat upon the stands, cheering their comrades as division by division, platoon by platoon, passed by for nearly seven unbroken hours.

Along the two-mile route fully , persons were gathered to watch the procession. The parade was, with few exceptions, composed of men who were young 30 years ago, but who are now advanced in years. They wore the blue uniforms of the Grand Army, which is neat, but not gaudy, and they marched as old men march.

With many it was an effort to cover that long stretch of road-way after waiting several hours to fall into line. Many were suffering from wounds which had never healed; many were broken and bent with rheumatism and other diseased incident to camp life. But what they lacked in grace and movement they made up in spirit and determination, and at every step they were cheered with heartiness which they would have been less than human not to appreciate.

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The posts marched in two parallel columns, each of 12 files front, to Fifthteenth street and then the columns united and formed one sold column of 24 files front. At the Treasury Department Vice President Morton reviewed the procession and at the War Department the veterans marched in review before their commander-in-chief, Gen. Illinois had the place of honor in the parade, the State being the parent of the Grand Army of the Republic.

Wisconsin came next, followed by Ohio. New York had 10 brigades in line. Massachusetts had posts. The Department of Virginia and North Carolina marched men in line. The Pennsylvania department mustered 15, strong and was the largest in the long and splendid parade. In the afternoon a consolidated band of 1, pieces gave a patriotic concert in the Capitol grounds.

The post with the largest membership in the country naturally attracted much attention, and this was intensified by a mammoth model of the typical industry of the city in which it is located. It is General Lander post of Lynn, Mass. They carried with them an immense shoe, twelve feet long. Preliminary to the festivities of the week was the dedication of Grand Army Place, located on the famous White Lot just south of the White House grounds.

A striking display was the surprise offered by the Iowa department. They carried in the air 3, cornstalks, some of them nearly six inches in diameter, and each man had an ear of corn strapped to his back. En route to Washington they were fired upon in Baltimore, April 19, and spilled the first blood after the assault upon Fort Sumter.

Several hundred men were present with the command. The following obituaries all have a common thread. Most of them also have some connection to the State of Pennsylvania, with one or two exceptions. At the bottom of the post, there are two articles about Civil War animal mascots — a dog and a rooster. Interment was made in Burnside Cemetery, alongside of his wife and daughter, who preceded him to the grave several years ago. It was a military funeral, conducted by members of the American Legion of Glen Campbell, assisted by a firing squad from the American Legion Post of Clearfield.

He was also proud of having marched with the million soldiers in the grand review at Washington, D. He was one of the pioneers of the northern part of Indiana county and helped to cut and raft a great deal of timber that grew in that section. He sometimes worked as one of the woods crew, but mostly as the camp cook. For the past 17 years he had made his home with his two daughters. He leaves the daughters, Mrs. James Judge of Hobart, Ind. Fred Brands of Gary, Ind. Wrote History of Conflict. Howard Wert, well known writer and educator, with many friends in Adams county where he was the superintendent of schools for several years, died Thursday night at his home in Harrisburg after a long illness at an advanced age.

He had been seriously ill for some weeks and his death was not unexpected. For years he had been living retired. His father, a man of exceptional ability, was a leader among Pennsylvania Abolitionists. His mother, also very gifted, was very conspicuous in the annals of early Methodism in Southern Pennsylvania. After a preliminary course in the rural public schools and the Gettysburg High School, in all of which he evinced a precocity which made him the marvel of the community, the deceased spent six years at Gettysburg College, graduating in While in college, he acquired considerable reputation as a writer; becoming a contributor to nearly all the Boston and New York literary periodicals of that day.

It was a story of sporting life in the large cities written at a time that the young author had never seen a larger town than Gettysburg. In various capacities, Professor Wert saw many of the stirring scenes of the Civil War, including the battle of Gettysburg, where he had exceptional opportunities for observation both during and after the conflict. During the Gettysburg campaign he did considerable service as a scout for which he was well fitted by his intimate knowledge of the whole surrounding country.

Concerning the decisive battle he had written many valuable articles and pamphlets, as well as an extended history, first published in , which had sold extensively on trains and on the field for several years. A second Gettysburg battle history written for a New York syndicate as a souvenir gift to G. Abram Rummel, one of the oldest and highly esteemed citizens of this place, was found dead Sunday morning in his chair at his home on the east side.

He was found by his daughter, Margaret, who having heard him arrange the fire earlier in the day, thought he was sleeping and did not disturb him until the breakfast hour.

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Evidently he attended the fire and then sat down in his accustomed chair as was his wont to often sleep there rather than lie down owing to heart trouble, and of which he evidently died. Rummel was born March 16, , at Creswell, Lancaster county, Pa. When a young man he joined his brothers Felix and Adam in the wagon making and smith trade at Germantown. While here he joined a local cornet band, which afterward tendered its services to Governor Morton and was assigned to the Twelfth Indiana Infantry as the regimental band and later the brigade band.

Of this band Amos Bear of Richmond is the surviving member. Returning to Germantown, Mr. The children are J. Willard Rummel of New Castle, and Mrs.

SHOT MAN PROVE FATAL — Red Bluff News 22 May — California Digital Newspaper Collection

Ida Martin and Miss Margeret Rummel of this city. Oscar Valentine died in Rummel joined Walnut Level lodge of Odd Fellows, which membership he transferred to Wayne lodge when he and his brothers came to this city and engaged in business the same as in Germantown. He was also a member of the G. Rummel was elected a town trustee and served five years.

In all those offices of honor and trust Mr. Rummel fitted his duty as he saw it. Whether as a soldier, a public servant, a lodge member, or a husband and father, he discharged his duties in that exalted manner that marks the exemplary citizen. Funeral services were held at the M. The attendance was large and the floral tributes many and very pretty. Image from the book, Wisconsin at Vicksburg on Google. Maltby, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Among the Possessions he left was a brief account of his army record, which is published below and will undoubtedly prove interesting to Gazette readers:.

The company was quartered in Sparta and joined the regiment at La Crosse. Was mustered into United States service September 14, , with Co. D, 25th Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. In December of that year the regiment was ordered back to Wisconsin and we marched from Mankato to La Crocce. Arrived at Madison Dec. On July 7, I got sick furlough home for 30 days, and rejoined my company and regiment at Helena, Ark.

At this time the 25th had only 57 men fit for duty and men on the company rolls. We were back in Vicksburg at the end of 30 days and then went by steamboat up the Mississippi to Cairo, then up the Ohio and the Tennessee rivers to Mussels Sholes,, then by rail to Decatur, Ala.

From there we marched to Chatanooga, Tenn. This division was in the flanking corps and was all the time marching or fighting. Our first battle was at Resaca , May 14, D lost just one-half of the company in killed, wounded and prisoners. Of the four captured, three were wounded and died in the Andersonville prison , while the fourth was exchanged. In January, , we went by transport to Beaufort, S. On February 1 we began the march for Richmond, Va. Our last battle was at Bentonville, N. From Raleigh we marched through Richmond and Petersburg to Washington; took part in the Grand Review and was mustered out the 7th day of June, , by reason of the end of the war.

Montgomery, colonel commanding the regiment. At the time we were mustered out at Washington, D. As he was born and raised in this community he was known as an upright, honest man, who always did unto others as he would have them do unto him. He had always been a strong, robust man and used to hard work. Last Friday he caught a heavy cold which developed into pneumonia and on account of his advanced age he was not able to withstand the disease and death ended his sufferings at the above mentioned time.

When the was clouds of the Rebellion hung heavy over our country, he was among the brave boys that went to the front to fight for the flag and country that he loved. This regiment was in the Third brigade, Third division and Ninth army corps of the Potomac. He was also in the fight Petersburg and was present when that city surrendered to the Union army. His regiment pursued Lee along South Side railroad to Notaway court house and only halted in their march when the news reached them that the brave southern General had surrendered at Appomotox court house.

Comrade Weight participated in all these engagements and was honorably discharged June 1, , at the close of the war, after which he took part in the grand review in Washington. He returned to his home at Ironsville after the war and followed his occupation, that of a knobler, at the Tyrone Forge.

In August, , he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Woomer, who preceded him to the grave December 25, When only a young man Mr. Weight united with the Methodist Epsicopal church, at Ironsville and he always endeavored to live according to its teachings. He was an active member of Colonel D. George Washington Weight was born near Ironsville, December 11, and was aged 74 years, 11 months and 13 days at the time of his death.

He leave to mourn his demise the following children: Katharine Mingle, of Birmingham. Also one brother, Thomas Weight, of Ironsville. Gordon Gray, the pastor. Interment will be made in Grand View cemetery. The services at the grave will be in charge of Col. Image from the website: Wisconsin Civil War Battle Flags. For nearly four months A. Dwinell of this city had been in failing health, and had been confined to his home under the care of a physician for just eight weeks. The first three or four weeks of this time he suffered greatly, but since then had been apparently much improved and was able to rest comfortably most of the time, both day and night, something that he had not been able to do at first.

On one or two occasions during the past couple of weeks his condition was considered critical at brief intervals, however, but he soon revived from these spells and was apparently on the road to enjoy better health. While fully realizing that his condition was most serious, and having expressed the opinion that he could not survive, making this remark for the last time yesterday, he was ever cheerful and did not complain, seeming to be ever solicitous for his faithful wife and daughters, who rarely left his side, even for a moment, during the past eight weeks.

Last night he retired at about 9: Dwinell heard her husband cough in a ajoining room, but as this was not unusual, she did not at once arise, getting up a few minutes later, however, and when she approached his bedside, she was horrified to find that her husband had passed away. He was lying peacefully as though in sweet sleep, having his hands folded over his breast and had undoubtedly died without a struggle. His illness and death was due to a compilation of dropsy and heart trouble.

Dwinell was born at Erie, Pa. When about 12 years of age his parents, Mr. Dwinell, moved to Michigan and after a short stay in that state, came to Fond du Lac and thence to Portage county in , this having been the home of the now deceased ever since. His father died in Stockton in and is mother in The son remained on the homestead in the town of Stockton until he enrolled as a soldier in the civil war in September, He enlisted at Plover in Co. The regiment organized at Fond du Lac, where it remained until March 6, , when it proceeded to Benton Barracks, St. Louis , and after a stay of two weeks went to Savannah, Tenn.

Orders were received to join the forces of Grant at Pittsburg Landing, and the regiment in which Mr. Dwinell was serving moved to embark on the transport, but did not arrive on the field until nearly midnight of April 6th, they forming in line of battle at once, notwithstanding heavy rain was falling.

They went into action and fought on the second day of the battle, where they acquitted themselves with conspicuous bravery. Dwinell performed provost duty at Pittsburg Landing until he was taken sick and sent to the hospital at St. Louis, where after two weeks he received a furlough for fifteen days, which was extended, and he reported to Gen.

Gaylord at Madison and remained in the hospital there until the fall of , when he received an honorable discharge and returned to Plover. Infantry, in the reorganized command. They then went to Cedar Creek, the command being engaged in skirmishing on the right.

At the latter place the soldiers were given the privilege of voting, and Mr. December 1st they went to Petersburg, going into winter quarters in front of that city, Mr. Dwinell performing picket duty until Feb. Fisher, and in April in the charge of Petersburg, his knapsack being shot from his back on the morning of the second day of that month and he was slightly wounded in the shoulder in the afternoon.

He also took part in the surrender at Appomatox , after which he went to Danville to the assistance of Sherman, but went back to Wilson Station and thence to Washington, where he was in the Grand Review and was discharged at Madison, June 20, , returning to the village of Plover. December 15, , he was married to Ida E. Morrill, who survives him. They were the parents of nine children, two of whom, Edith died at the age of two years, and Fred J.

Those who survive are George L. Rhodes of Madison, Allie, now Mrs. Miss Ethel, who is employed as stenographer for the Wilbor Lumber Co.


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He also leaves one brother, C. Dwinell of this city, and two sisters, Mrs. Amasa Ball of Idaho and Mrs. Clara Perkins, who resides somewhere in the west. Dwinell had resided in this city since and had served as alderman and supervisor, being elected as supervisor again at the April election. He was a man of far more than ordinary ability, shrewd, sharp and progressive, and he always took an active interest in home, state and national affairs.

In politics he was a Democrat for a number of years, but for the past several years had been affiliated with the Republican party. The only organization that he belonged to was the Grand Army Post, being a charter member of the local society. The time of the funeral has not been fully decided, and will not be until the arrival of his sons and daughters, but will probably not take place until Sunday afternoon.

James Blake of the Baptist church will officiate and the officers of the local Post will not doubt conduct the services at the grave. When he died, this ornament was left around his neck and the body was wrapped in a small American flag before being buried. Jack accompanied the regiment through the following battles: At the battle of Malvern Hill he was shot through the shoulder and back. At Salem Heights he was captured, held a prisoner and exchanged for a Confederate soldier. During the engagement at Savage Station he was again taken prisoner, but detained only six hours.

During the entire war he followed the regiment, and when the army assembled in Washington for the grand review Jack was one of the conspicuous features of the parade. He was taken to one of the northern counties of the state by one of the officers of the regimental association, who kept him until he died. When the 16th regiment marched through town, a little white bantam rooster was observed perched on the knapsack of one of the men.

We learn that it has an interesting history. It was carried from Madison in and taken into the ranks of the 32d regiment, which it accompanied through the Mississippi march to Meridian and back to Vicksburg, thence to Decatur, Alabama, and on the march to Atlanta, at whose capture it was present on the grand march through Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, to Raleigh. With the 32d it went north to Washington and with it passed in the grand review.

Subsequently it was transferred to the 16th veterans and in now mustered out and on its way home. The little fellow had been carried on the knapsack the entire rounds, and has been in all the battles and skirmishes in which the 32d has participated. A Philadelphia paper has ascertained that Noah Webster used to play euchre and steal eggs. The ghost of Noah Webster came to a spiritual medium in Alabama not long since, and wrote on a slip of paper: It is found everywhere, and has done much good and we think much evil. It is not generally known that Dr.

The first issue of his system, more than half a century since, was received with hoots and laughter. But the Doctor, having the capital of great learning, industry and obstinacy to back him, kept hammering on the public until his revised and less offensive later editions were received with favor. Webster started out with the idea to spell by sound as nearly as possible, as h-a-z for has and w-o-o-d for would, and was only induced to withdraw such radical changes, because he perceived that they never would be received.

He then compromised with the difficulty and made all the changes he dared in the orthography and orthoepy of the language. His dictionaries, even as thus revised called forth immediate and persistent denunciation from the most able scholars in the Union and the jeers of the English people. But the Doctor subsidized a power which is more powerful than learning orthodoxy and pride of race — he advertised largely in the newspapers, and canvassed the entire Union by well paid and able agents.

By degrees familiarity with the unauthorized liberties he had taken with the language grew into the usages of life and the education of the young, and now we find ourselves face to face with the strange anomaly of professing to speak and write the English language, and chiefly using as a standard a work which is utterly repudiated by the entire English people and the best portion of our own scholars, as subversive of etymology, as revolutionary, as partisan and unauthorized by the masters of the English tongue.

And just here we affirm that we are under shackles to Noah Webster and his successes, in so far as we receive the palpable alterations his later editions give in the meaning of important words bearing on politics and governmental relations. The dictionary as left by Dr. This can easily be proved. Noah Webster made a voyage to England, before the days of steam in ocean navigation, to hear how the best educated men in that country pronounced their own language; but found neither greater uniformity nor perfection on the other side of the water than on this, and so gave up the idea of a pronouncing dictionary.

He found it equally hard, though he made the attempt, to introduce uniformity in spelling. In a free country like this, every man is supposed to have the right to spell and pronounce according to his own notions. His pen was as ready as his purse in the service of all human kindness. And what a pen it was! It could discourse metaphysics so clearly and lucidly as to make them seem plain moralizing. It could tear a sophism to pieces by a mere query. It could make a simple tale read like a subtle argument. He could be grave and he could be gay in a breath. In another tone, he translates into human language, for the amusement of a court lady, the reflections, in the garden of her house, of a gray-headed ephemera, full seven hours old, on the vanity of all things.

In it, the left hand bewails the partiality which educated the right hand exclusively. But it was not recollection so much as fancy. His fancy clothed every idea in circumstances. When the illustration had served its turn, he was indifferent what became of it. Franklin did injustice to himself when he fancied he wanted any such mechanical aid.