Television and Common Knowledge (Comedia)

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  3. Television and common knowledge / edited by Jostein Gripsrud - Details - Trove

Grouped into thematic sections, contributors first examine how common knowledge is assumed and produced across the huge social, cultural and geographical gulfs that characterise modern society, and investigate the role of television as the primary medium for the production and dissemination of knowledge.

Later contributions concentrate on specific tv genres such as news, documentary, political discussions, and popular science programmes, considering the changing ways in which they attempt to inform audiences, and how they are actually made meaningful by viewers. The context of glohalization. Evaluating things you do not know ahout. Polyscmy amhiguity and contradiction. Credibility and media development. In praire of discontinuity. Such tasks have included a drawing contest, [21] or spotting an item on the video screens and waving a "joker" card e.

Several series have had a recurring task spanning every episode, often involving the use of a joker card to respond to a question whose answer fit a specified theme.


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In addition to assigning tasks, Fry performed scientific experiments or demonstrations during certain episodes. He often did so once an episode in the J, K and L series, where they were called "Jolly Japes", "Knick-Knakes" and "Lab Larks", respectively, and usually occurred towards the end of the episode. Such experiments either used simple objects, various chemical compounds, odd contraptions, or a mixture of all.

If an experiment's outcome was too fast to be seen, a short "replay" of it was shown, sometimes with multiple angles to reveal precisely what happened. Heggessey passed on the format, opting to commission a similar panel game called Class War which was never made. When Fincham became controller of BBC One, Lloyd pitched it to him, only to be turned down by his former collaborator. In October , it was announced that Fry would be stepping down as host after Series M and would be replaced by Sandi Toksvig. Toksvig said that " QI is my favourite television programme both to watch and to be on".

Recordings usually take place over a few weeks in May or June at The London Studios ; three episodes are typically filmed per week and sixteen are filmed for each series. In the morning on the day of recording, the studio has to be set up. Seven cameras are used to record QI.

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Fry, who was given the list of questions roughly an hour beforehand, [14] hosted the second technical rehearsal at 2: For earlier series, warm-up comedians were used before recording began, frequently Stephen Grant , credited as the "audience wrangler". Fry recorded and tweeted audience AudioBoos and introduced the guests before the show. The makers of the show insist that the answers are not given to the panellists beforehand. In an interview with the Radio Times regarding the current state of the BBC , Fry revealed one of the regular panellists insists on seeing the questions before they appear in the show.

I won't tell you his or her name," he said. In fact, one day, I'll make sure that person is given a list from another programme because they don't need them. Following this comment people asked Fry to come out and say who it was, with several people posting their suggestions as to who it was. Fry later posted on his Twitter account that it was neither Davies nor Rob Brydon. The "elves" devise the questions for the show, and one is on set during filming who is able to communicate with the host during the show to provide and correct information.

The title is taken from an entry into the "Oxford Dictionary of Underwater Life", which was used on the show. The audio from the first episode in which they discuss how they found this fact is used as an introduction. Dan is the host of the show. The theme song is "Wasps" from the band Emperor Yes , which is based on a fact about bees which was used on QI. The song is written as an exchange between the bees, as they defend their hive from attacking wasps by swarming the wasp, and using their body heat to boil the wasps.

In QI , every series takes its theme from a different letter of the alphabet, starting with the letter "A". Series are referred to by letter rather than number. The first series started on 11 September , and consisted of topics beginning with A. The second series consisted of topics beginning with "B" and also saw the first attempts to pay attention to a particular theme throughout one episode, e. The only exceptions to the alphabet system have been the Christmas specials, where the topics are often Christmas-based and do not necessarily correspond to that series' letter although greater attempts have been made to do so since Series D.

Series D was the first to see all the episodes focus upon a single topic or theme, beginning with the series letter i. This trend has continued with each subsequent series; with episodes from previous series were retroactively given titles. A video podcast featuring the best moments with some out-takes was planned to accompany Series E, but this was instead turned into a set of "Quickies" featured on the QI homepage of the BBC's website. As this decision was not reached until after recording, the videos are still referred to as "vodcasts" by whoever is introducing them usually Fry but occasionally a panellist or even the audience.

Points may be given to or taken from the audience, and five episodes have the distinction of being won by the audience: The audience's win in "Greeks" was only announced during the XL broadcast as their contribution was cut out of the main broadcast. In contrast, the audience lost the 5th episode of Series E, "Europe", receiving a forfeit of when they incorrectly sang the first stanza of the German national anthem. A special stand-alone episode was filmed between 1: The shows were streamed live on the Red Nose Day website, and parts of each show were shown during five half-hour specials on Comic Relief.

Davies admitted through Twitter that he was asked to host the episode when it was not certain if Fry would be available, but Davies declined. Once Fry confirmed his participation, Davies did not hear back from the production team. The following have all appeared multiple times as one of the guest panellists on the show, including any as-yet unbroadcast episodes of Series P.

This list only includes "canonical" episodes of the BBC show. It does not include the unbroadcast pilot, nor the special editions for the Comic Relief and Sport Relief telethons, nor any live stage editions. Jimmy Carr and Phill Jupitus are the only remaining guests to have appeared in every series to date.

Rich Hall has the highest number of guest appearances in a single series—six times in Series B half of the episodes that year —as well as the highest number of wins by a guest panellist, with Toksvig took over hosting duties from Fry from the start of Series N. As of , QI is distributed by FremantleMedia.

The programme was first broadcast on 20 October after the surprise ratings success of Stephen Fry in America. In , the ABC was criticised in Federal Parliament for showing QI repeats and other shows featuring Stephen Fry too frequently, so much so that at a parliamentary enquiry one speaker asked "how viewers would know they were actually in Australia" and not Britain. There have been several attempts to broadcast QI in the United States. Show creator and producer John Lloyd said that one factor in the failure to get the show broadcast is due to the cost.

As QI features several images during each episode there are copyright issues. Lloyd said in an interview with TV Squad that: The pictures in the background of the show are only cleared for UK usage, so until the show is bought by a Stateside TV company and the rights cleared for World, the programme is unaffordable by smaller countries. Davies has criticised QI being repeated so often, saying " QI being in a soup of shows on one of these repeat channels Davies thought the show would gain more viewers when a new series aired if channels "[made] an audience wait for a couple of months".

Also called QI , the Dutch version of the show aired for the first time on 27 December and was hosted by the writer Arthur Japin with the comedian Thomas van Luyn taking the role of regular panellist. The Dutch series was discontinued after six episodes. Comedian Johan Wester hosts Intresseklubben , and Anders Jansson is featured as the regular panellist.

Some of the answers on the show have been disputed and shown to be incorrect.

The top 50 BBC Two shows of all time

For example, in Series A, the show claimed that the longest animal in the world was the lion's mane jellyfish , [64] but this was later corrected in Series C, saying that the longest animal in the world is the bootlace worm. Members of the public and members of the QI website contact the show to correct information. The error that has attracted the most complaints to date was made in Series B, when it was claimed that the Welsh language has no word for blue.

In fact it is glas. Another episode in Series B claimed that the language spoken by children's TV characters Bill and Ben was called "Flobbadob" and was named after the onomatopoeic phrase that creator Hilda Brabban's younger brothers after whom the characters were named gave to their bath farts during their early childhood. The fart-in-the-bath story was trotted out last year in an episode of Stephen Fry's otherwise admirable quiz show QI. It the story first appeared some twenty years ago in a newspaper article, to which my father immediately wrote a rebuttal.

This was obviously ferreted out by some BBC researcher. It may be quite interesting, but in this case, it just isn't true. Fry then apologised and corrected the error, saying "Their language is called 'Oddle poddle'. Various other retractions are made by the producers of the show on the special features of the DVD releases. The origin of the error may also be explained. Information contributed by a panellist during a discussion, but which has since been found to be false, is also corrected here.

For instance, Fry made a mistake when explaining why helium makes your voice higher, in the Series B Christmas special. He claimed that the gas only affected the frequency , but not the pitch , despite them being the same thing; in actuality, the timbre is affected. The "Knowledge" episode in Series K included point refunds for the three panellists who had appeared previously; it was explained that many facts on the show are later shown to be incorrect.

The largest refund went to Davies, who received in excess of seven hundred wrongly deducted points. More recently, the online forum now includes a "QI Qibbles" blog, which aims to rectify further mistakes in the series. QI has stated it follows a philosophy: The website states that:. Eskimos do not rub noses. The rickshaw was invented by an American. Joan of Arc was not French.

Lenin was not Russian. The world is not solid, it is made of empty space and energy, and neither haggis , whisky , porridge , clan tartans or kilts are Scottish. So we stand, silent, on a peak in Darien a vast, rolling, teeming, untrodden territory before us. Whatever is interesting we are interested in. Whatever is not interesting, we are even more interested in. Everything is interesting if looked at in the right way.

At one extreme, QI is serious, intensely scientific, deeply mystical; at the other it is hilarious, silly and frothy enough to please the most indolent couch-potato. In December , panellists on QI made jokes during a discussion about Tsutomu Yamaguchi , who survived both atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August Regular panellist Jo Brand commented that Lady Thatcher sounded like "a device for removing pubic hair". Later, panellist Phil Jupitus shouted "Burn the witch!

Several Conservative politicians condemned the remarks; and Lord Tebbit complained that "Lady Thatcher has been treated like this by the BBC for the past 30 years". A spokesperson for the BBC said that the episode was filmed in June and had no relation to current events. In , an episode of QI featuring Jeremy Clarkson was withdrawn due to controversial comments Clarkson had recently made about people committing suicide by jumping in front of trains.

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The QI episode did not contain any such statements, but was postponed "to avoid putting Clarkson in the spotlight". The episode, on the subject of "idleness", was broadcast later. On 11 January , an episode of QI ending with Fry reading a limerick about paedophilia was criticised by viewers, especially as it was broadcast directly before a Newsnight report on Jimmy Savile.


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The BBC Trust described the incident as "unfortunate and regrettable" and the limerick as "capable of causing offence", but ruled it was not in breach of BBC guidelines. Number of female panellists in the first episodes of QI. BBC has received criticism regarding the lack of women on their comedy panel shows.

As a result, the corporation decided to ban all-male panels on comedy shows in February , [87] with BBC's director of TV Danny Cohen stating in an interview with The Observer that "shows without women are unacceptable". Talent fees for QI are managed by Talkback. Julia Raeside of The Guardian [18]. QI was received very positively by its viewers. QI has been supported by nearly all critics. Peter Chapman said, "When the schedules seem so dumbed-down, it's a delight to encounter the brainy and articulate Stephen Fry. He excels in this format, being both scathing and generous.

Julia Raeside from The Guardian reviewed the show during its tenth series, calling it "still rather more than quite interesting" and complimenting it for being "one of the last truly popular programmes on mainstream television where comedians are allowed to be clever". Matt Smith gave QI Live a positive review, calling it "funny, educational, and He commented that "much like the television show, your enjoyment of the stage version will be affected by how you perceive the guests", but went on to say that he enjoyed the line-up in the show he saw. QI has entered a number of different media, and has seen an increasing number of tie-in DVDs, books and newspaper columns released since Most of the book's facts and clarifications have appeared on the programme, including its list of popular misconceptions, many of which featured during the "General Ignorance" rounds.

On 8 December , the book "became a surprise bestseller over the Christmas period, becoming Amazon 's number one Global bestseller for Christmas Pocket-sized and audio versions of General Ignorance went on sale the following year. In , a newly revised version was published under the title of The Book of General Ignorance: The Noticeably Stouter Edition.

This edition corrected and updated some of the information from the first print, while adding 50 new sections and extra illustrations to the original It also included quotes from the series, new "Four Words" by Davies and added a complete episode listing from Series A—F, along with an index.

This book was eventually published in as Advanced Banter. Written by the same authors, this book covers a whole new series of questions on a wide variety of topics, which promises to prove that "everything you think you know is still wrong". The covers, which feature various cartoon scenes starring caricatures of Fry and regular QI panellists, are produced by David Stoten one of Roger Law 's Spitting Image team , who also contributed to the annuals' contents. Many of said cover stars are also credited with contributing content to the annuals, which also provide a showcase for Rowan Atkinson 's talents as a 'rubber-faced' comic, as well as the comic stylings of Newman and Husband from Private Eye , Viz's Chris Donald , Geoff Dunbar, Ted Dewan and The Daily Telegraph 's Matt Pritchett.

Wolke , Ian Stewart and Raymond Smullyan. An Italian edition entitled Il libro dell'ignoranza "The book of ignorance" was published by Einaudi in and in the same publisher published Il libro dell'ignoranza sugli animali "The book of ignorance about animals". A number of DVDs related to QI have also been released, including interactive quizzes, and complete series releases.

A second interactive game, QI: A DVD release for the first series was the direct result of an internet petition signed by 1, people, which persuaded the BBC of the interest in such a move.


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The Complete First Series. On 14 December Network Distributing a video publishing company made an announcement on its website that it had made a deal with FremantleMedia so previously unreleased shows could be made available on DVD sometime in ; among the list was QI. A box set of series 1—3 Series A-C was released in September Fifty-two columns were planned, originally alphabetically themed like the TV series and running from A to Z twice, but the feature is ongoing and was recently re-launched in the newspaper's Saturday magazine and online.

There is also a weekly QI linked multiple choice question featured in the Radio Times , with the solution printed in the feedback section. QI also has an official website, QI. It also links to QI ' s internet show QI News , a parody news show which broadcasts "News" items about things which are "quite interesting". There is also a rolling selection of quotes from Advanced Banter. The App also allows users send interesting information to the QI elves in the form of "postcards" and can be rated on the "Interestingometer". It would have been broadcast during the daytime schedules.

The pilot was not hosted by Fry and was recorded in November , but a series has yet to be broadcast.

Television and common knowledge / edited by Jostein Gripsrud - Details - Trove

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses of "Qi", see Qi disambiguation. Stephen Fry — Sandi Toksvig —. Talkback Quite Interesting Limited. The Book of General Ignorance. List of QI episodes. Richard Coles Reginald D. Musical comedian and actor Bill Bailey has appeared on 42 episodes as well as the pilot.

Comedian Jimmy Carr is one of two guest panellists to appear in every series. Former Never Mind the Buzzcocks captain and comedian Phill Jupitus has also appeared in every series. Bailey, Jo Brand and Jupitus are the only guest panellists to have made 37 or more appearances. You feel like you're at the pub with the funny, clever people, ear-wigging on their slightly tipsy meanderings, rather than standing against a wall while they fire their joke cannons at you.