The Realm Of Faerie - Fairy Life And Legend In Britain (Folklore History Series)

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  1. Fairies in Legend, Lore & Literature
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  3. The Realm of Faerie - Fairy Life and Legend in Britain (Folklore History Series)
  4. Fairies in Legend, Lore & Literature – Norfolk Tales & Myths
Fairy Folklore of County Clare

King and numerous others produced wonderful fairy pictures for these volumes. Jessie King, like William Blake before her, was an artist who passionately believed in the fairies. In the pre-cinema world of the Victorians, theatre, ballet, and opera had greater importance as forms of popular entertainment than they enjoy today — as well as a greater influence on the visual and literary arts. In the s, the new Romantic ballet as opposed to formal, classical ballet thrilled large audiences in London with productions that dramatized tales of love between mortals and fairy spirits.

In theater, fairy plays were staged with stunningly elaborate special effects, each new production striving to be even more spectacular than the last.


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Fairy music for the harp was composed and performed by charismatic musicians as popular then as pop stars are now, and young women swooned and followed their favorite harpists from concert to concert. Magical music and dance reached its height in the works of Tchaikovsky, the brilliant Russian composer who took London — indeed, all of Europe — by storm. In literature as in art, theater, and ballet the fairies made their presence known, turning up in numerous books written and published during the Victorian era. But one of the major shifts we see in fairy literature from the 19th century onward is that more and more of it was published in books intended for small children.

There were two major reasons why this shift occurred, despite the fact that adult fascination with fantasy and fairies had rarely been so high. Children, according to this earlier view, came into the world in sin and had to be strictly civilized into God-fearing members of society. By Victorian times, this belief was changing to one in which children were inherently innocent, rather than inherently sinful — and childhood became a special Golden Age, a time of fanciful play and exploration before the burdens of adulthood were assumed.

But in the 19th century, new European fairy tale collections by the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen were proving enormously popular with English children. Although there were some good fantasy tales of the conventional type, such as the fairy stories of Jean Ingelow and the ghost stories of Mary Louisa Molesworth, many others were forgettable confections full of twinkly fairies with butterfly wings and good little boys and girls who caused no disturbance to the status quo. Nesbit in her later works , and many other writers created magical tales that were archly critical of Victorian life, promoting the possibility of a better society.

The prevalence of utopian fantasy is explained by looking at the context of the culture which produced it — a society in the grip of great upheaval due to rapid industrialization. Fairies flittered across London stages and nested in bucolic scenes on gallery walls, but outside on the city streets it was a long, long way from Never Land, crowded as they were with beggars, cripples, prostitutes many of them children , and with homeless, desperate men and women displaced by the new economy.

While the upper classes charmed themselves with fairy books and dancing nymphs, and clapped to bring Tinkerbell back to life, in the lower classes, both urban and rural, fairies remained a different matter altogether. Here, the delicate winged maidens depicted by painters and ballet dancers were superseded by the fearsome creatures of the still-living oral tradition. Throughout the 19th century, the British newspapers reported cases of fairy sightings, curses, and abductions. The most famous of these incidents occurred as late as , and riveted newspaper readers all across the British Isles.

This was the murder of Bridget Cleary, a spirited young woman in Ireland who was killed by her husband, family, and neighbors because they thought she was a fairy changeling. Bridget Cleary had fallen gravely ill, and the family had consulted a Fairy Doctor. He claimed that Bridget had been abducted and taken under a fairy hill, and that the sickly creature in her bed was a fairy changeling in disguise. The doctor devised several ordeals designed to make the changeling reveal itself — ordeals that soon grew so extreme that poor Bridget died.

Although this was the most flamboyant case of changeling-murder in the Victorian press, sadly it was not the only account of brutal mistreatment of those deemed to be fairies.

Fairies in Legend, Lore & Literature

Usually the poor victims were children, born with physical deformities or struck by sudden wasting illnesses. The last major fairy encounter reported widely by the British press took place in the tranquil countryside of Yorkshire in — when Elsie Wright, sixteen years old, and Frances Griffith, her ten year old cousin, contrived to take photographs of fairies at play in their Cottingley garden. Championed by Gardner and Conan Doyle, the photos caused an absolute sensation. Only when Elsie and Frances were old ladies did they finally admit that the Cottingley fairies were paper cut-outs held in place by hat-pins.

Despite this admission, their final deathbed statements on the subject were more ambiguous, implying that the fairies, if not the photographs, had been real after all.


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In her fascinating book Strange and Secret Peoples: Fairies and Victorian Consciousness, Carole G. Silver points out that the Cottingley incident, despite briefly reviving interest in the fairies, was actually one of the factors that ended the Golden Age of fairy art and literature.


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And yet, it is interesting to note that one of the most popular art prints of the war era depicted a simple country boy playing a pipe, surrounded by fairies. One could find them if one looked hard enough — in Ireland, for instance, in the fiction of James Stephens and Lord Dunsany; or in Lud-in-the-Mist, the early fantasy classic by English author Hope Mirrlees.

But in general, it was not until an Oxford don named J. Tolkien wrote about elves in a place called Middle-Earth that fairies came back to popular art in any numbers. And then they came with a vengeance. Professor Tolkien was a scholar of folklore, myth, and Old English literature, so when he created the elves of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, he knew what he was doing.

This in turn created an enormous interest in all things magical, wondrous, and fey. Suddenly there were fairies, dragons, unicorns, mermaids, and wizards everywhere.

The Realm of Faerie - Fairy Life and Legend in Britain (Folklore History Series)

People started seeking out folklore texts, and teaching themselves to speak Elvish. Back in the s, this was a radical notion. Tolkien dismissed the post-Victorian idea that fantasy was fit only for children, and reached back to an older adult fantasy tradition running from Beowulf to William Morris. In the mids, another book lured adult readers into the Twilight Realm.

But whereas Gnomes depicted cheerful little creatures who had little in common with the dour, clever, metal-working gnomes of the European folk tradition, Faeries was deeply rooted in traditional fairy lore. Here, in all their beautiful, horrible glory were the fairies of old British legends: Lee and Froud had taken inspiration from Victorian Fairy Art and updated the tradition for a new generation. In fiction, the great success of The Lord of the Rings helped to establish an entire new publishing genre of fantasy fiction for adult readers; and as a result, a new generation of writers turned to folklore and myth for inspiration — in North America as well as in England.

John Crowley, for example, in his brilliant novel Little, Big, draws on a host of Victorian ideas about the fairies to create a modern fairy tale set in rural and urban New York. See the Further Reading list below for more fiction recommendations. Return to Book Page. This fantastic book is a must read for anybody who has an interest in fairy lore and the history of folklore concerning the fairy. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 's and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original t This fantastic book is a must read for anybody who has an interest in fairy lore and the history of folklore concerning the fairy.

We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork. Paperback , pages.

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The Realm of Faerie - Fairy Life and Legend in Britain (Folklore History Series)

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Fairies in Legend, Lore & Literature – Norfolk Tales & Myths

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